The White Horse by Mark Wallinger
The White Horse by Mark Wallinger

Turner Prize winning artist Mark Wallinger's sculpture unveiled at British Council, Delhi:

On 18 November, 2015, the British Council unveiled 'The White Horse' (2013), a sculpture by Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger at the iconic British Council building in New Delhi. The horse made of marble and resin is a life-size representation of a thoroughbred racehorse created using state of the art technology.

India is the first overseas destination for this iconic sculpture commissioned by the British Council, London. It will be on view on the front lawns of the British Council Delhi for the next 3 years.

The sculpture illustrates Wallinger’s continuing fascination with the horse, and its emblematic status in British national history.

It relates to the ancient history of hillside depictions of white horses in England but the pose is familiar from current depictions of thoroughbred stallions and has been replicated throughout the history of art from Stubbs’ painting of Eclipse to Wallinger’s own paintings of stallions from the Darley Stud.

The unveiling of the sculpture is part of British Council’s arts and culture initiative, ReImagine Arts that aims at building creative connections in new ways between the people of the UK and India.

The focus in India on ReImagine Arts involves designing and delivering programmes, which update perceptions of the two countries in the 21st century. A significant part of the British Council's work in the arts connects the UK’s arts sector with professionals in India. 

  

 

About 'The White Horse': 

It was first unveiled outside the British Council’s London headquarters on the Mall, on 5th March 2013. In 2008, Mark Wallinger won an international competition to build a monument at Ebbsfleet in Kent, at the Thames estuary. Wallinger’s winning entry, a white horse, 25 times life-size, and standing some 50 metres tall, has not to date been completed due to a funding shortfall. 

The White Horse is a life-size version. It illustrates Wallinger’s continuing fascination with the horse, and its emblematic status in British national history. The White Horse sculpture relates to the ancient history of hillside depictions of white horses in England but the pose is familiar from current depictions of thoroughbred stallions and has been replicated throughout the history of art from Stubbs’ painting of Eclipse to Wallinger’s own paintings of stallions from the Darley Stud.

The Thoroughbred was first developed at the beginning of the 18th century in England, when native mares were crossbred with imported Arabian stallions. Every racehorse in the world is descended from these animals, 90 per cent from the Darley Arabian.

 

About Mark Wallinger

 

Mark Wallinger (born 1959) is a British Artist best known for his sculpture for the empty fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, Ecco Homo (1999) and for State Britain (2007), a recreation at Tate Britain of Brian Haw’s protest outside the British parliament. 

Wallinger studied at the Chelsea School of Art and at Goldsmiths College where he later became a tutor. The social commentary of his early work and his focus on class, royalty and nationalism is evident in his paintings throughout the 1980s. In the 1990s be began to use a wider range of material and techniques in his art.

In 1995 he was nominated for the Turner Prize largely as a result of his work A Real Work of Art, which was a racehorse which Wallinger had bought and named and intended to race. His later work reflects an interest in religion, death and myth. Works in this period include Angel a video installation, and No Man’s Land a show at the Whitechapel gallery. His interest in myth is evident in Ghost (2001), a negative print of George Stubbs’ famous horse painting Whistlejacket with a horn added to its head turning it into a unicorn.

Mark Wallinger represented the UK at the Venice Biennale in 2001. He won the Turner prize (his second nomination)  in 2007. 

 

About the British Council

The British Council is the UK’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities.The British Council was established in India in 1948. The British Council is recognised across India for its network of 9 libraries and cultural centres.

We offer a range of specialised projects in arts, education, exams, English language and society to audiences across India and more than 100,000 members. We also provide access to English language training and learning for both students and teachers, offer UK qualifications in India and enable opportunities to study in the UK.

For information on our work in India, please visit: www.britishcouncil.in

 

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