Publications in this area explore current trends in the use of English in India within education systems.

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English Next India

David Graddol

This is the second publication in the English Next series and forms part of a wider programme of work by the British Council which aims to contribute to the development of English language teaching and learning in India. This book examines the complex nature of English in both the education and employment sectors and aims to set out an agenda for debate. David Graddol analyses demographic and economic trends and suggests how they may influence language policies that will impact on India’s future.

Indian school education system: an overview

This report gives an overall picture of the vast and continuously changing landscape of the Indian school education system. It aims to inform the readers of various facets of the school education system across the country. This report captures the progress of the country since Independence in the field of education. It covers the main government initiatives and also provides a comparative study of major Indian national boards of school education with global ones including the International Baccalaureate and Cambridge International Examinations.

English impact report: investigating English language learning outcomes at the primary school level in rural India

Edited by Vivien Berry

This report is the result of a truly cross-cultural and multidisciplinary collaboration between Indian and UK institutions and stems from a strategic partnership that the British Council has with the NGO Pratham. Colleagues from the Pratham-ASER Centre worked in tandem with the English and Exams research teams in India and the UK. This report was launched in November 2013 as part of the British Council's UK-South Asia Season 2013. While this report is primarily for those involved in the framing and implementation of English language policy in education systems in India, it has wider implications for countries with a similarly wide cache of multicultural and heteroglossic capital. The report is also meant to be a useful tool for the wider community of scholarship on English language teaching, assessment and evaluation and for institutions and individuals involved in measuring or seeking measurable outcomes from educational interventions.